Category Archives: Galileo Receivers

Galileo Receivers

Broadcom releases world’s first dual-Frequency GNSS Receiver

Broadcom_BCM47755 Dual-Frequency GNSS ReceiverNo longer will a high-end, expensive GNSS receiver be required to achieve centimeter accuracy now that Broadcom Limited has announced the launch of its new dual-frequency receiver with such accuracy designed for consumer location-based services (LBS) applications.

Broadcom, a designer, developer and global supplier of a broad range of digital and analog semiconductor connectivity solutions, recently announced the world’s first mass-market, dual-frequency GNSS receiver device, the BCM47755, designed to enhance LBS applications for mobile phones, tablets and fitness wearables. Equipped with the latest GNSS innovations, the device is capable of centimeter accuracy with minimal power consumption and footprint, enabling an entirely new suite of high-precision LBS applications including lane-level vehicle navigation and mobile augmented reality (AR). Read more…

Is your phone using Galileo?

Is your phone using GalileoGalileo could improve your phone’s location accuracy up to 100 times. Here’s how to find out if you can use it and what it can do.

Like other systems, Galileo is integrated at the chipset level. So, to benefit from its location services, your phone has to be manufactured with a Galileo-enabled chipset.

Nowadays, companies that account for 95% of the global supply of smartphone chipsets are in contact with the Galileo team. This means a vast majority of the new-generation of phones such as Apple’s iPhone X, Samsung’s S8, Huawei’s Mate 10 and Google’s Pixel 2 are all Galileo-enabled. Read more…

iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X are Galileo-enabled

iphone8The new features of the latest iPhone, launched on September 13, include built-in support for the European Galileo satellite system, among other GNSS. This multi-constellation support means that the new phones will offer more accurate positioning, making it harder for iPhone users to get lost, wherever they are.

Apple unveiled its iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, in addition to the iPhone X, at a much-anticipated event held at the Apple campus in Cupertino, California on September 13. Read more…

GNSS Receivers

GNSS Receivers process the Signals In Space (SIS) transmitted by the satellites, being the user interface to any Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Even though the information provided by a generic GNSS receiver can be used by a wide range of applications, most of them rely on the receiver’s navigation solution – i.e. receiver computed Position, Velocity and Time (PVT).

GNSS receivers determine the user position, velocity, and precise time (PVT) by processing the signals broadcasted by satellites. Because the satellites are always in motion, the receiver has to continuously acquire and track the signals from the satellites in view, in order to compute an uninterrupted solution, as desired in most applications. Read more…

Galileo arrives on the Space Station

SCaN Testbed on ISS

SCaN Testbed on ISS

If one’s good, two are better, and this is especially true when it comes to developing new applications for navsat systems like Galileo and GPS. That’s why an experiment on the International Space Station will start receiving signals from both simultaneously.

Satellites of America’s GPS provide signals for navigation and timing services in an enormous variety of applications worldwide – on smartphones, in automobile navigation systems and in economically vital services like aviation, maritime traffic and banking.

Today, GPS is synonymous with satnav, but after years of development and regular launches, Europe’s Galileo navigation system has come of age: its 18 satellites – soon to be 24 plus in-orbit spares – are now transmitting the highly accurate signals necessary to deliver navigation services across a wide range of activities. Read more…

Orolia Announces Global Distress Safety System

Through its McMurdo brand, Orolia announced its global aeronautical distress safety system (GADSS)-compliant distress tracking emergency locator transmitter (ELTDT). The product, known as the GADSS ELTDT, performs autonomous tracking of commercial aircraft in distress through processes such as trigger-in-flight capability. This allows for the beacon to automatically transmit a distress signal with the aircraft’s accurate position. Read more…

Winners of the European Inventor Award 2017 – Radio signals for better satellite navigation

Galileo_team_EIA17Space-based radio navigation positioning has made significant strides in recent decades. It is now poised to make a greater leap thanks to Galileo, Europe’s global navigation satellite system (GNSS). Signalling technology developed by a team of European engineers not only helps Galileo deliver better accuracy and clear up signal clutter; it also pushes satellite navigation and its features to the next level.

A European team, led by French engineer Laurent Lestarquit and his Spanish colleague José Ángel Ávila Rodríguez and including German Günter Hein and Belgian Lionel Ries, has a unique specialism: sending clear signals from space. A virtual cacophony of radio frequencies is sent down to earth from the more than 50 navigation positioning satellites currently in orbit – including those of the US-led Global Positioning System (GPS), Russia’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) and more recently Europe’s Galileo system. This team has helped ensure that signals do not interfere with each other, and that users and developers alike will be able to profit from the next-generation positioning technology that Galileo offers.

The team’s contribution of modulation and spread-spectrum signal technologies forms one of the joint European satellite positioning system’s core components, delivering signals that enhance accuracy, save on satellite power and ensure interoperability with GLONASS and the current GPS and its possible upgrades. Read more…

Galileo signal team nominated for invention award

Jose_Angel_Avila_Rodriguez_(left)_and_Laurent_Lestarquit_(right)The engineering team behind the signal technology underpinning Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation system has reached the final of this year’s European Inventor Award, run by the European Patent Office.

The team is led by Spanish engineer José Ángel Ávila Rodríguez – now part of ESA’s Galileo team – and his French colleague Laurent Lestarquit from France’s CNES space agency.

The team also includes German Günter Hein, formerly head of the department studying the evolution of EGNOS and Galileo for ESA, as well as Belgian Engineer Lionel Ries, now in ESA’s technical directorate, as well as French CNES engineer Jean-Luc Issler. Read more…

Huawei’s New P10 and P10 Plus smartphones support Galileo

Huawei P10

Huawei P10

Huawei’s new P10 and P10 Plus smartphones support Galileo, providing users with more precise positioning.

Huawei, the world’s third largest smartphone vendor, recently announced that its newest flagship smartphones are Galileo-enabled. This includes the company’s newly-launched P10 and P10 plus models, as well as its Mate 9, Mate 9 pro and Porsche Design Mate 9 smartphones. The Huawei phones are equipped with Broadcom Limited’s Galileo-enabled BCM4774 GNSS chipset. Read more…

Septentrio GNSS technology guarantees DEME’s operations in areas of interference

Septentrio_AsteRxThe Belgian dredging, environmental and engineering group DEME relies on the accuracy and reliability of the AsteRx family of precise GNSS positioning solutions from Septentrio.

DEME is using Septentrio’s AsteRx GNSS receivers to obtain centimetre-level accuracy for all their dredging and marine construction operations worldwide. These receivers are specifically designed to operate in difficult conditions: from ice-covered Arctic ports to the tropical climates of Southeast Asia; whether dredging a few metres from the coast line to constructing wind turbines kilometres out at sea. Read more…