Category Archives: Galileo Services

Galileo Services

[vid] Galileo is ready to be used

With 18 Galileo satellites in orbit, supporting ground infrastructure, and after an extensive testing period, Galileo Initial Services are now available for public authorities, businesses and citizens. From now on, users around the world can be guided using the positioning, navigation and timing information provided by Galileo’s global satellite constellation. Read more…

Galileo initial services available #GalileoGoesLive #MyGalileo

Europe’s own Galileo satellite navigation system has begun operating, with the satellites in space delivering positioning, navigation and timing information to users around the globe.

This animation shows how service availability increases as the overall number of satellites in the Galileo constellation goes up.

Today, the European Commission, owner of the system, formally announced the start of Galileo Initial Services, the first step towards full operational capability. Read more…

Galileo to Go Live on Thursday

Galileo Constellation

Europe’s Global satellite navigation system is all set to go live this Thursday. Seventeen years and more than 10 billion euros ($11 billion) later, Europe’s Galileo satnav system promises to outperform US and Russian rivals while boosting regional self-reliance. Initial services will be free to use worldwide on smartphones and navigation boxes fitted with Galileo-compatible microchips. Some devices may only need a software update to start using the new technology, as several smartphone companies were already making chips compatible with it.

At first the signals might be a little weak but will be boosted with help from satellites in the US military-run GPS system, and grow stronger over time as orbiters are added to the now 18-strong Galileo network orbiting 23,222 kilometres (14,430 miles) above Earth. Read more…

GSA accepts Loyola de Palacio facility – home of the GSC in Madrid

GSC acceptance meetingThe European GNSS Agency (GSA) has formally accepted the new Loyola de Palacio facility, which houses the European GNSS Service Centre (GSC), from the Spanish government, a key milestone in the development of the Galileo programme and its service provisions, which is scheduled to begin later this year with the declaration of Initial Services.

“The GSC is a key asset for the Galileo programme; it is Galileo’s door to the GNSS world,” said GSA Executive Director Carlo des Dorides. “Today, the GSA is pleased to accept this excellent facility from Spain. It is a symbol of the upcoming service phase and the single, unique interface for Galileo users.” Read more…

First EGNOS LPV-200 approach

First EGNOS LPV-200 approachThe GSA announces that the first LPV-200 approaches were implemented at Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport (LFPG) on 3 May, the first such approaches to be implemented in Europe. LPV-200 enables aircraft approach procedures that are operationally equivalent to CAT I instrument landing system (ILS) procedures. This allows for lateral and angular vertical guidance during the final approach segment (FAS) without requiring visual contact with the ground until reaching a decision height (DH) of only 200 feet above the runway. (The minima for localiser performance with vertical guidance, or LPV, are as low as 200 feet.) Read more…

Google opens up GNSS pseudoranges

Google has announced that raw GNSS measurements will be available to apps in the Android N operating system, which will be released later this year. This means pseudoranges, dopplers and carrier phase will be obtainable from a phone or tablet computer.

The announcement came during Google’s I/O 2016, its three-day developer conference which was held May 18-20. The specific announcement occurs during a video summary of the conference, shown below.

“This is groundbreaking,” says Steve Malkos, a technical program manager at Google. “It is the first time in history that a mobile application will have access to Read more…

Galileo PRS signal accessible via the cloud

Galileo drone at ordnance surveyIn what is being described as a “world first” the Public Regulated Service (PRS) of the new European satellite network Galileo has been delivered via the “cloud”, paving the way for its automated use by emergency and security services and critical national infrastructure (CNI) as the secure position and timing service of choice across Europe.

The ability to access the PRS via the cloud overcomes a major problem for some potential PRS users due to the security protocols that are required when managing the cryptographic keys needed to access the signals. Read more…

GNSS for autonomous vehicles

Speaking at a session completely dedicated to autonomous vehicles, GSA Head of Market Development Gian-Gherardo Calini said that accurate and reliable positioning information is a clear enabler for autonomous vehicles. “With its dual frequencies, better reliability and ability to cope with multi-path characteristics in urban environments, Galileo could be a big differentiator in this potentially huge market,” he said.

However, implementing the technologies is challenging. For example, according to Centro Ricerche Fiat Programme Manager Luisa Andreone, the higher you moved up the automation levels in vehicles, the more accurate the positioning requirements are. Other key elements are signal availability, integrity, affordability and regulations. Read more…

PRS, diamond service

One area where Galileo is likely to have maximum impact is the Public Regulated Service (PRS). The PRS will provide a robust and encrypted positioning and timing capability restricted to governmental authorised users. Speaking at the event, DG Growth Head of Unit, Galileo Directorate Philippe Jean described the service and the access control mechanisms that will minimise interfering threats and so offer continuity of service in times of crisis. “The PRS signal structure has better resilience to jamming and interference,” he said. Jean also said that the Member States and the Commission are considering how to allow secure access to PRS by third-party countries.

“Active contributions from all the different stakeholders involved in PRS is required to ensure delivery of service to authorised users,” added GSA PRS Officer Marco Detratti. “Competent PRS authorities (CPAs) are being established at the national level, but to build trust, the system and equipment must deliver a truly robust service that grants unlimited and uninterrupted access worldwide.” Read more…

GNSS timing service

The timing services supplied by GNSS are an increasingly important, but often unrecognised, part of today’s modern infrastructure. This is because the vital role of space-based timing is only exposed when it fails. To shed some light on just how important these services are, this year the Munich Satellite Summit’s legal session focused on the timing aspects of GNSS.

“Many sophisticated timing applications rely on GNSS signals,” said BHO legal partner Dr Oliver Heinrich. “However, they tend to be taken for granted and are only noticed when things go wrong, such as what happened on 26 January when a software upload to GPS satellites induced a 13 millisecond misalignment – a small difference that had a big global impact. Read more…