Tag Archives: Ariane 5

Galileo launch 8, VA233 (17-11-2016)

Launch of 4 new Galileo satellites

Liftoff of Ariane flight VA233An Ariane 5 rocket has launched four additional Galileo satellites, accelerating deployment of the new satellite navigation system.

The Ariane 5, operated by Arianespace, lifted off from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana at 13:06 GMT (14:06 CET, 10:06 local time) carrying Galileo satellites 15–18. The first pair was released 3 hours 35 minutes and 44 seconds after liftoff, while the second separated 20 minutes later.

The Galileos are at their target altitude, after a flawless release from the new dispenser designed to handle four satellites. Read more…

[vid] Ariane 5 VA233 mission flight sequence

The following video describes the Nov. 17 Ariane 5 mission’s flight sequence, designated Flight VA233 in Arianespace’s numbering system.

Liftoff is planned on Thursday, November 17, 2016 at exactly:
– 10:06:48 a.m., Kourou time
– 08:06:48 a.m., Washington D.C. time
– 13:06:48, Universal Time (UTC)
– 02:06:48 p.m., Paris time

 

Ariane 5 arrives at the launch zone

the-ariane-5-nears-completion-of-its-transfer-from-the-spaceports-final-assembly-building-to-the-ela-3-launch-zoneArianespace’s sixth Ariane 5 for liftoff this year has rolled out to the launch zone in French Guiana, clearing the way for the heavy-lift vehicle’s first-ever mission to orbit satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation system.

The completed Ariane 5 was transferred today atop its mobile launch table from the Final Assembly Building – where payload integration occurred – to the Spaceport’s dedicated ELA-3 launch complex, setting the stage for Arianespace’s ninth overall mission in 2016 across its full family of Ariane 5, Soyuz and Vega vehicles.

Designated Flight VA233 in the company’s numbering system, this upcoming Ariane 5 mission – set for Thursday, November 17 – will lift off at exactly 10:06:48 a.m. local time in French Guiana and deploy its quartet of Galileo spacecraft during a nearly four-hour flight.

VA233. Ariane 5 launch campaign

galileo-satellites-lowered-into-position-for-installation-atop-the-central-core

Galileo satellites lowered into position for installation atop the central core

Antonianna, Lisa, Kimberley and Tijmen – the latest Galileo spacecraft for Europe’s satellite navigation constellation – have been integrated with their Ariane 5 launcher in French Guiana for a November 17 Arianespace mission.

The four 715 kg satellites – named for winners of a European children’s drawing contest – were attached to their dispenser as a combined ‘upper composite’ and transported to the final assembly building on 31 October.

The next step saw them put on top of the upper stage of their customised launcher. Finally, on 3 November, the quartet was enclosed within a protective fairing – the last time they were seen by human eyes – to protect them from the onrushing atmosphere during ascent.

Arianespace previously has lofted 14 Full Operational Capability (FOC) and In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites for Galileo from French Guiana with seven missions utilizing its medium-lift Soyuz vehicle, along with two other Soyuz flights from the Baikonur Cosmodrome that deployed the GIOVE-A and GIOVE-B experimental satellites.

Read more…

Four new satellites to join Galileo constellation

VA 233. Quad satellites see spaceOn 17 November at 13:06 GMT (14:06 CET), a single Ariane 5 rocket is set to propel four Galileo satellites into orbit for the navigation constellation’s first-ever quadruple launch. Mission controllers are training intensively for the complex space delivery.

Ariane 5 will use a new payload dispenser to release four identical satellites into orbit in one go.

This will be the eighth Galileo launch, and will bring the number of satellites in space to 18. Once complete, the system will sport 24 operational satellites and a ground network to provide positioning, navigation and timing services. Read more…

Ariane 5 ready for first payload of Galileo satellites

ariane 5's bay hoisted for integrationThe initial Ariane 5 to loft four global positioning satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation system has begun its build-up at the Spaceport in French Guiana for a milestone Arianespace mission in November.

This launcher is an Ariane 5 ES version that began the integration process begining of October, with the cryogenic core stage’s positioning over a mobile launch pad, followed by integration of the vehicle’s two solid propellant boosters.

Designated as Flight VA233 in Arianespace’s numbering system, the mission’s Ariane 5 was assembled inside the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building. During activity in the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building, the heavy-lift vehicle for Arianespace Flight VA233 underwent the assembly process that began by mating Ariane 5’s two solid propellant strap-on boosters with the main cryogenic stage. Read more…

Galileo’s Ariane 5 arrives at Europe’s Spaceport

Unloading Ariane 5

The first Ariane 5 rocket modified to carry four Galileo satellites into orbit has arrived at Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana for a November launch.

So far, 14 Galileo satellites have been launched two by two on Soyuz rockets from French Guiana. This inaugural launch by Ariane 5 will boost that number to 18.

The MN Colibri roll-on/roll-off ship, built to transport European rocket elements, reached French Guiana’s Pariacabo Port on 22 August. Read more…

Galileo’s Ariane 5 dispenser ready at spaceport

Four-satellite Galileo dispenserFollowing rigorous testing in France and Germany, a new type of dispenser designed to carry four navigation satellites into orbit at once is now in French Guiana, in place for Galileo’s first Ariane 5 launch later this year.

The dispenser is an essential element of launch success, with a double role to play. Firstly it must hold the quartet of satellites securely in place during the stresses of liftoff, and then the nearly four-hour long flight to medium-Earth orbit.

Then, once the Ariane 5 EPS upper stage reaches its target 23 222 km altitude, the dispenser has to release the four Galileo satellites smoothly Read more…