Space is not the final frontier

Franck Proust (EPP, FR), Vice-Chair of Parliament’s sky and space intergroup

Franck Proust (EPP, FR), Vice-Chair of Parliament’s sky and space intergroup

By Franck Proust*:

Europe must be realistic when it comes to its space policy, and protect its industry to ensure the EU space sector can compete globally, says Franck Proust.

From institutions to private actors, all Europeans must realise that working to support Europe in becoming the space power of the 21st century should be a common goal, bringing benefits to all citizens.

The political will exists. With the ‘Space strategy for Europe’, EU leaders have demonstrated their support for a competitive European space sector, against a background of intense global competition. The 10th conference on European space policy is therefore an opportunity to demonstrate that actions speak louder than words. Read more…

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[vid] What is Galileo?

Satellite positioning has become a vital part of our daily lives and is a key for farming, science, precise timing and emergency response. We use it on our phones, cars, planes, trains, ships and thousands of other applications. In 2016, Galileo, the European Global Navigation system launched its initial services.

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EU relocates GSMC facility to Spain

A scientist works on the Galileo satellite system

A scientist works on the Galileo satellite system

A part of the infrastructure for the Galileo satellite system will be relocated from the Britain to Spain because of the UK’s departure from the EU, the European Commission has announced.

The back-up Galileo security monitoring centre for Galileo was originally awarded to London in 2010 after a competitive process.

The centre, which was due to become fully operational later this year, controls access to the satellite system and provides around-the-clock monitoring of it when the main security centre, near Paris, is offline. Read more…

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Ariane 6’s Vulcain engine set for first firing

Vulcain 2.1

Vulcain 2.1

A Vulcain rocket engine recently arrived in Germany ahead of its first test firing in December to demonstrate new capabilities and technologies developed for Ariane 6.

The Vulcain 2.1 will help to propel Ariane 6, new-generation launcher for Galileo, in the first 10 minutes of flight, up to an altitude of 200 km.

The engine delivers 135 tonnes of thrust in vacuum, and weighs the same as an Airbus A318 jet engine but provides more than 10 times the power. Read more…

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Third Galileo IS OS Quarterly Performance Report now available

Third Galileo IS OS Quarterly Performance ReportThe third Galileo Initial Services Open Service (IS OS) Quarterly Performance Report, with information on the status of the Galileo constellation covering the period from July to September 2017 is now available.

These quarterly reports provide the public with the latest information on the Galileo Open Service measured performance statistics, in particular, on parameters such as: Read more…

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[vid] Galileo Launch 9 liftoff replay

Europe has four more Galileo navigation satellites (satellites 19–22) in the sky following their launch from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana at 18:36 GMT (19:36 CET, 15:36 local time), on an Ariane 5 rocket, operated by Arianespace.

 

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Galileo launch brings navigation network close to completion

Liftoff of Ariane 5 Flight VA240 from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou

Liftoff of Ariane 5 Flight VA240 from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou

Europe has four more Galileo navigation satellites in the sky following their launch on an Ariane 5 rocket. After today’s success, only one more launch remains before the Galileo constellation is complete and delivering global coverage.

Ariane 5, operated by Arianespace under contract to ESA, lifted off from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana at 18:36 GMT (19:36 CET, 15:36 local time), carrying Galileo satellites 19–22. The first pair of 715 kg satellites was released almost 3 hours 36 minutes after liftoff, while the second pair separated 20 minutes later. Read more…

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Galileo launch 9 at a glance

Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation system will come a giant leap nearer completion on Tuesday 12 December, as four more Galileo satellites are launched into orbit by Ariane 5.

Liftoff from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana is scheduled for 18:36 UTC (19:36 CET, 15:36 local time), carrying Galileo satellites 19–22.

The launcher’s attitude and trajectory are controlled by the two onboard computers, located in the Ariane 5 vehicle equipment bay (VEB). Read more…

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Galileos 19-22 near completion

Macron, Juncker and Wörner visit Europe's Spaceport

Macron, Juncker and Wörner
visit Europe’s Spaceport

The Galileo global navigation satellite system has been offering initial services since almost a year and the performances are great. Independent measurements and evaluation of the system show that the European system is currently the best satellite positioning system in the world.

A symbolic image of the European Space Port in Kourou (French Guiana) as the President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker, the French President Emmanuel Macron, and
the Director General of the European Space Agency Jan Wörner, stand in front of the Ariane 5 launcher, which will soon carry 4 more Galileo satellites into space.

On 12 December at 19:36 CET, an Ariane 5 will launch from Kourou with 4 new Galileo satellites, adding to the constellation which is set to be completed next year.

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Flight VA240: Arianespace’s second Ariane 5 launch for the Galileo constellation

Ariane 5’s fairing is lowering over the payload of four Galileo navigation satellites. Flight VA240.

Ariane 5’s fairing is lowering over the payload of four Galileo navigation satellites.

For its 11th launch of the year, and the sixth Ariane 5 liftoff from the Guiana Space Center (CSG) in French Guiana during 2017, Arianespace will orbit four more satellites for the Galileo constellation.

This mission is being performed on behalf of the European Commission under a contract with the European Space Agency (ESA).

For the second time, an Ariane 5 ES version will be used to orbit satellites in Europe’s own satellite navigation system. At the completion of this flight, designated Flight VA240 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system, 22 Galileo spacecraft will have been launched by Arianespace with Soyuz and Ariane 5 launchers. Read more…

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