Category Archives: Other

Winners of the European Inventor Award 2017 – Radio signals for better satellite navigation

Galileo_team_EIA17Space-based radio navigation positioning has made significant strides in recent decades. It is now poised to make a greater leap thanks to Galileo, Europe’s global navigation satellite system (GNSS). Signalling technology developed by a team of European engineers not only helps Galileo deliver better accuracy and clear up signal clutter; it also pushes satellite navigation and its features to the next level.

A European team, led by French engineer Laurent Lestarquit and his Spanish colleague José Ángel Ávila Rodríguez and including German Günter Hein and Belgian Lionel Ries, has a unique specialism: sending clear signals from space. A virtual cacophony of radio frequencies is sent down to earth from the more than 50 navigation positioning satellites currently in orbit – including those of the US-led Global Positioning System (GPS), Russia’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) and more recently Europe’s Galileo system. This team has helped ensure that signals do not interfere with each other, and that users and developers alike will be able to profit from the next-generation positioning technology that Galileo offers.

The team’s contribution of modulation and spread-spectrum signal technologies forms one of the joint European satellite positioning system’s core components, delivering signals that enhance accuracy, save on satellite power and ensure interoperability with GLONASS and the current GPS and its possible upgrades. Read more…

Webinar – Galileo and the future of SatNav

Today’s Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) market is huge. Growing demand for precise location information on smartphones and other hardware has seen GNSS technology embedded in 5 billion devices around the world – a figure that is expected to grow to 8 billion by 2020.

In this Webinar, “Galileo and the future of SatNav: drones, smart cities and self-driving cars” (June 13, 5pm CET), the GSA (European Global Navigation Satellite Systems Agency) will review the market – revealing findings from the latest edition of the GSA’s GNSS Market Report – and provide insight on global trends and future developments. In particular, the webinar will explore: Read more…

Galileo signal team nominated for invention award

Jose_Angel_Avila_Rodriguez_(left)_and_Laurent_Lestarquit_(right)The engineering team behind the signal technology underpinning Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation system has reached the final of this year’s European Inventor Award, run by the European Patent Office.

The team is led by Spanish engineer José Ángel Ávila Rodríguez – now part of ESA’s Galileo team – and his French colleague Laurent Lestarquit from France’s CNES space agency.

The team also includes German Günter Hein, formerly head of the department studying the evolution of EGNOS and Galileo for ESA, as well as Belgian Engineer Lionel Ries, now in ESA’s technical directorate, as well as French CNES engineer Jean-Luc Issler. Read more…

GSA launches 2017 GNSS Market Report

GNSS_market_report_2017_issue5In the fast evolving world of satellite navigation technology and GNSS applications, monitoring the landscape and having the latest information is essential. With its in-depth look at market opportunities and trends across eight market segments, the GSA’s 2017 GNSS Market Report is a key resource for successfully navigating this exciting market.

The growing demand for precise location information, in combination with the ongoing evolution of GNSS technology, means that today’s GNSS market is bigger than ever. According to the 5th edition of the GSA’s popular GNSS Market Report: Read more…

IGS 2017 workshop

IGS 2017 workshopThis year, the IGS (International GNSS Service) Workshop will feature a special keynote lecture on the Galileo system, given by Marco Falcone of the European Space Agency (ESA). The keynote will address the current status of the now 18-satellite constellation, with special focus on the commissioning of the last four satellites, which were launched in November 2016. Overall system performance will also be discussed, including availability of signal in space, satellite ranging, positioning, and associated availability at the user level. Falcone will address timing performance with regard to Galileo System Time in contrast to UTC as well as GPS to Galileo Time Offset. He will also discuss the mission recovery of the GSAT201 and 202 satellites in elliptical orbit, plans for GSAT104 usage, satellite production, and the path ahead to full operation capaability. Read more…

Europe for Space, Space for Europe

In 1957, only 12 years after the end of the Second World War, the Treaty of Rome was signed to forge a closer union among the people of Europe.

60 years later, Europe, working together, has accomplished things no European country could have done on its own, making life in Europe safer, sustainable and competitive.

We have advanced science, together we pushed back the frontiers of knowledge reached for the sky, expanded our capabilities and independene, and built systems that make a real difference for Europeans, the world and our planet.

Happy 60th birthday, Europe! Together we are stronger.


 

Connecting Europe and Asia through GNSS

Connecting Europe and Asia through GNSSHome to over 60% of the world’s population, Asia is the world’s fastest growing economic region and an increasingly important global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) market. In fact, as the region transforms itself into a knowledge-based economy, several countries are preparing to launch their very own GNSS constellations. At the same time, companies from across the region are inserting themselves at every point of the GNSS value chain, including the manufacturing of chipsets. Read more…

FCC seeks comments on Galileo use in US

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is inviting public comments on the European Commission’s request for a waiver of licensing requirements applicable to Galileo receivers in the United States. Comments are due Feb. 21. Read the notice here.

If the waiver is approved, Galileo-capable receivers won’t need to be licensed in the U.S. At present, FCC rules require that receivers operating with non-U.S.-licensed space stations obtain a license. Read more…

Do winter weather conditions have an effect on the accuracy of GNSS devices?

GPS receiver at Concordia Research Station, AntarcticaAlthough most of us won’t be navigating through such extreme conditions, to find out, the European GNSS Agency (GSA) asked the experts working in Antarctica.

The holidays are over and all we are left with is another couple of months of cold, wet and foggy winter weather. And there’s nothing worse than having to travel in winter weather conditions. Whether it’s walking to a meeting or driving across town, at least you can depend on global navigation satellite systems (GNSS), including Galileo, to help guide you to your destination along the most efficient route possible. All you have to do is plug the coordinates into your smartphone or in-vehicle navigation device, bundle up and head out – letting GNSS take care of the rest. Read more…

Father of GPS meets Europe’s Galileo team

Brad ParkinsonBrad Parkinson, hailed as the father of GPS, has visited ESA’s technical heart to meet the team behind Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation system.

Brad Parkinson was awarded the 2016 Marconi Prize for his part in developing satellite navigation. In 1972, then a US Air Force Colonel, he was put in charge of “Program 621B”, which became the Global Positioning System. Over one long September weekend in 1973 he and his team decided all key GPS elements. The first satellite was launched in February 1978.

Paul Verhoef, ESA’s Director of the Galileo Programme and Navigation-related Activities, invited Prof. Parkinson to ESA’s facility in the Netherlands to address the Directorate’s annual gathering on 11 January. Also present were members of the European Global Navigation Satellite System Agency – set to oversee newly operational Galileo services – and the European Commission. Read more…