Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) Service

Search And Rescue (SAR) operations involve locating and helping people in distress. Launched as part of the Galileo Initial Services, Galileo is the first GNSS constellation offering global SAR capability. The service will be available at sea, in the mountains, across the desert and in the air inside the Galileo/SAR Service Coverage area, this essential Galileo service helps operators respond to a distress signal faster and more efficiently. Read more…

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Galileo Search and Rescue service ready for green light!

Xavier Maufroid of the European Commission moderated the SAR session in Munich

Xavier Maufroid of the European Commission

The Galileo Search and Rescue (SAR) service is Europe‘s contribution to the international emergency beacon locating system called COSPAS-SARSAT. This essential Galileo service has the potential to dramatically reduce the time to locate and reach people in distress on sea and land. The 2017 Munich Satellite Navigation Summit saw a dedicated session that outlined the potential impact of the full Galileo SAR service.

Session chair Xavier Maufroid of the European Commission welcomed participants to the first ever discussion of Galileo SAR at a Munich Summit by screening a preview of the service’s launch video. The service itself was officially launched on 6 April 2017 – a date chosen to highlight the COSPAS-SARSAT 406 MHz signal. Read more…

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Europe for Space, Space for Europe

In 1957, only 12 years after the end of the Second World War, the Treaty of Rome was signed to forge a closer union among the people of Europe.

60 years later, Europe, working together, has accomplished things no European country could have done on its own, making life in Europe safer, sustainable and competitive.

We have advanced science, together we pushed back the frontiers of knowledge reached for the sky, expanded our capabilities and independene, and built systems that make a real difference for Europeans, the world and our planet.

Happy 60th birthday, Europe! Together we are stronger.


 

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Connecting Europe and Asia through GNSS

Connecting Europe and Asia through GNSSHome to over 60% of the world’s population, Asia is the world’s fastest growing economic region and an increasingly important global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) market. In fact, as the region transforms itself into a knowledge-based economy, several countries are preparing to launch their very own GNSS constellations. At the same time, companies from across the region are inserting themselves at every point of the GNSS value chain, including the manufacturing of chipsets. Read more…

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The shift towards a multi-constellation GNSS environment

Carlo des Dorides. The shift towards a multi-constellation GNSS environment

Carlo des Dorides, GSA Executive Director

With the launch of Galileo Initial Services and the availability of numerous Galileo-enabled chipsets and receivers, users are benefiting from the stronger GNSS performance that a multi-constellation environment provides.

As the GSA’s GNSS Market Report shows, the global GNSS market remains dynamic. GNSS is used around the globe, with 3.6 billion GNSS devices in use in 2014. By 2019, this is forecasted to increase to over 7 billion – an average of one device per person on the planet. Smartphones continue to dominate, being the most popular platform to access location-based services, followed by devices used for road applications. Other devices may be less numerous, but billions of passengers, professionals, consumers and citizens worldwide benefit from their application in efficient and safe transport networks, in productive and sustainable agriculture, and in surveying and critical infrastructures. Read more…

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Development, Supply and Testing of Galileo Open Service

Development, Supply and Testing of Galileo Open ServiceBefore full service of Galileo Open Service (OS) can be achieved, a new generation of OS-Navigation Message Authentication-enabled user terminals must be developed, tested and implemented, says the European GNSS Agency (GSA).

Because of this, the GSA has launched a new funding opportunity to support the development, supply and testing of a Galileo Open Service authentication user terminal. The Galileo OS will soon provide a Navigation Message Authentication (NMA) feature, known as OS-NMA. Via this feature, users can verify that a navigation message comes from a Galileo satellite and not a potentially malicious source. The Open Service is the Galileo program’s free service for positioning, navigation and timing. Read more…

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Galileo and EGNOS test campaign for eCall devices

Galileo and EGNOS test campaign for eCall devicesThe GSA, along with the European Commission, invite all eCall device manufacturers, which are suppliers of the automotive industry, to participate and assess their eCALL devices’ capability to support the reception and processing of the Galileo and EGNOS signals. The GSA, along with the European Commission, invite all eCall device manufacturers, such as tier-1 suppliers, to participate and assess their devices’ capability to support the reception and processing of the Galileo and EGNOS signals.

The testing initiative follows the 17 January 2017 publishing of European Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2017/79. According to the regulation, all new M1 (passenger cars) and N1 (light duty vehicles) types must be equipped with eCall in-vehicle systems as of 31 March 2018. Read more…

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New Authentication Method to Make Sending False Galileo Signals More Difficult

Galileo satellite signals will become more difficult to falsifyGNSS systems are based on satellites that send out signals, including their location. The distance to four or more satellites makes it possible to determine someone’s geographical position and time. But this process can go wrong when hackers send out signals of their own that drown out the real ones. As the authentic signals are blocked, the position information for the navigation system is no longer correct. Read more…

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Smart cities get a boost from Galileo

Smart cities get a boost from GalileoThe vision of a smart transport system for cities has so far given rise to many technologies, from driverless cars to automatic detection of incidents and traffic light-free transportation designs. The GHOST consortium is contributing with a solution of its own: geo-localised snapshots of ‘Points of interest’ (POI) reporting the likes of street lighting anomalies or road deterioration.

The idea behind GHOST (Galileo EnHancement as BoOster of the Smart CiTies) is simple yet incredibly effective. Instead of requiring heavy investment in new technologies, the consortium makes use of existing public transport solutions and connects them to a web portal by means of a camera equipped with a Galileo receiver. Once set up, the system takes pictures of predefined POIs, sends them to an image processing server that automatically detects anomalies, and reports these anomalies to relevant authorities by means of a web portal. Read more…

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Septentrio GNSS technology guarantees DEME’s operations in areas of interference

Septentrio_AsteRxThe Belgian dredging, environmental and engineering group DEME relies on the accuracy and reliability of the AsteRx family of precise GNSS positioning solutions from Septentrio.

DEME is using Septentrio’s AsteRx GNSS receivers to obtain centimetre-level accuracy for all their dredging and marine construction operations worldwide. These receivers are specifically designed to operate in difficult conditions: from ice-covered Arctic ports to the tropical climates of Southeast Asia; whether dredging a few metres from the coast line to constructing wind turbines kilometres out at sea. Read more…

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